One Potato, Two Potato: Trying Recipes From Korean Youtube

I've only started cooking relatively recently, so I'm always on the hunt for quick and easy recipes. The past few months, the YouTube algorithm has been recommending countless recipe videos to me, and one channel in particular has caught my eye: one meal a day.

Snapshot of the "one meal a day" channel page

one meal a day, or OMAD is a Korean cooking channel that uploads weekly. From what I can tell, it's a one-person show. OMAD's videos are light watches -- the videos are funny and comforting, and they're all less than 5 minutes long, making the steps in the recipe easy to remember. Though the videos have Korean audio, all the videos have been subtitled by OMAD in English and 11 other languages, so no worries about missing any instructions.


I noticed that a good amount of OMAD's recipes feature potato, and having just bought a big sack of potatoes at the grocery store, I tried out a few of those recipes for myself. So let's go and see how they turned out!



Potato Omelette (a.k.a. tortilla de patatas)


Tortilla de patatas is a Spanish potato omelette made using eggs and potatoes. Like any omelette, you can add in whatever fillings you want. I'll be keeping it pretty simple in this attempt, but feel free to go crazy on your own omelette!


The recipe:


What I used:

From the recipe:

  • 3 eggs

  • 1 large potato

  • 1/2 of a small red onion

  • Cooking oil

  • Salt and pepper to taste

My additions:

  • 1 slice of prosciutto

  • Handful of shredded mozzarella cheese

My results:


My takeaways:

Really good! Tortilla de patatas was one of my favorite dishes from when I visited Spain. Even though this doesn't compare to Spain, it hits the spot. If you're looking to up your omelette game without overcomplicating it, this recipe is it.


My advice:

Using an appropriately sized pan is a must for this recipe. I used a 5-inch egg pan, which was juuuust enough for me to pour in my egg and potato mixture without spilling. I think a 5 or 6-inch pan will work best for a 3 egg omelette -- a pan that's too big will spread your eggs too much and it won't cover your potatoes. If you want to add cheese like I did, I recommend pouring in half the mixture into the pan, adding the cheese, and then pouring in the second half of the mixture. That way, you'll get the layer of cheesy goodness right in the middle.



Cheese Hotteok


Hotteok is a small Korean pancake with filling. Hotteok is traditionally made with a flour dough and a sweet, sugary filling, but this recipe is a savory twist on the original.


The recipe:


What I used:

From the recipe:

  • 5 small potatoes (OMAD uses 2 large ones)

  • 3/4 to 1 cup of shredded mozzarella and cheddar cheese

  • 1 tsp brown sugar

  • Cooking oil (enough to coat the bottom of your pan)

  • Salt and pepper to taste

My additions:

  • 4 tbsp non-glutinous rice flour (substituted in place of glutinous rice flour)

*This made me 6-7 pieces of hotteok


My results:


My takeaways:

Tasty, but definitely a step up in time and difficulty from the last recipe. This recipe is one where I'll need some practice! There's a lot that I would do differently in a second attempt.


My advice:

I accidentally used non-glutinous rice flour instead of glutinous -- DON'T DO THIS. Even though my end result was still delicious, using non-glutinous flour meant my dough stayed more mashed potato-like instead of forming that stretchy texture in the video. The crumbliness of my dough made it very hard to fill and shape my hotteok, though I managed in the end. If you don't have glutinous rice flour, use corn starch instead of other flours -- giving your dough some stretchiness will make it 10x easier. You'll be able to put in more cheese and don't have to worry about your hotteok's shape getting distorted as you move them around during the cooking process.


Korean Potato Pancakes


Let's continue the pancake trend! These pancakes are probably closer to the ones you're familiar with. If you've ever been to a Korean restaurant, you know how many delicious Korean pancakes are out there, from kimchi to seafood. These potato pancakes are no exception.


The recipe:

What I used:

From the recipe:

  • 4 small potatoes

  • 1 tsp of brown sugar

  • Salt and pepper to taste

  • Cooking oil

My additions:

  • 1/2 of a small red onion (substituted in place of scallion because I ran out)

  • Kewpie mayonnaise (for dipping)

My results:


My takeaways:

Sooooo yummy! It takes some handiwork to grind the potatoes by hand, but it's worth it. Though I kept to a minimal amount of ingredients for this first attempt, this is definitely a recipe you can be creative with in terms of additional mix-ins. I'll probably try this recipe again with bacon and carrots. Instead of OMAD's more traditional dipping sauce, I ate my pancakes with some kewpie mayo instead for some extra creaminess.


My advice:

Most people probably don't have the kind of grater that OMAD uses, but don't worry. The puckered, spiky side of your average box grater should do the trick (personally, I have a multi-purpose peeler which has a mini-size version of OMAD's grater -- it worked, but was pretty time-consuming due to its small size). I found that my potatoes oxidized quite quickly after I grinded them; while this doesn't affect the taste, it can cause the pancake to come out more greyish-brown instead of golden-brown. You can add a bit of lemon juice or white vinegar to the just-grated potatoes to stop the browning.



Wrap-up


I was really impressed with the quality of these recipes, considering how uncomplicated they were! These recipes were all pretty easy to pick up, and I remembered most of the steps from watching the videos once, only needing to refer to them a couple of times to check the quantity of ingredients. If you're a budding cook like me seeking to expand your repertoire with some simple dishes, or even an experienced cook on the lookout for new recipes, I totally recommend checking out one meal a day for yourself. With the wide range of recipes on there, the channel definitely has a dish for everyone. Happy cooking!